Proceedings of the National Convention by Compilation

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The reader of the arguments presented in the following pages will naturally desire some information concerning the history of the movement, the auspices under which it arose, and the methods by which it has been prosecuted during the ten years of its history.
The religious defect of the Constitution of the United States was not unnoticed at the beginning.

Proceedings of the National Convention

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The reader of the arguments presented in the following pages will naturally desire some information concerning the history of the movement, the auspices under which it arose, and the methods by which it has been prosecuted during the ten years of its history.
The religious defect of the Constitution of the United States was not unnoticed at the beginning. Luther Martin, a delegate from Maryland to the Convention which framed it, said: "There were some of the members so unfashionable as to think that a belief of the existence of a Deity, and of a future state of rewards and punishments, would be some security for the good conduct of our rulers, and that in a Christian country it would be at least decent to hold some distinction between the professors of Christianity and downright infidelity and paganism."
On the 28th of October, 1789, the First Presbytery Eastward in Massachusetts and New Hampshire presented a loyal and patriotic address to President Washington, in which, after expressing their satisfaction in beholding how easily the entire confidence of the people in the man first entrusted with the administration of the new Constitution had eradicated every remaining objection to its form, they add: "Among these [objections] we never considered the want of a religious test—that grand engine of persecution in every tyrant's hand—but we should not have been alone in rejoicing to have seen some explicit acknowledgment of the only true God and Jesus Christ, whom He hath sent, inserted somewhere in the Magna Charta of our country."
In the early part of the present century the eminent Dr. John M. Mason, of New York, employed these words: "One would imagine that no occasion of making a pointed and public acknowledgment of the Divine benignity could have presented itself so obviously as the framing an instrument of government which, in the nature of things, must be closely allied to our happiness or our ruin; and yet that very Constitution, which the singular goodness of God enabled us to establish, does not so much as recognize His being."

Additional Information

Author Compilation
Publisher James B Rodgers
Pages 103
Edition No
Binding Hard Back
Condition B+
Dustjacket No
Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION— History of the Movement to secure the Religious Amendment of the Constitution of the United States

PROCEEDINGS OF THE CONVENTION:
Call for the Convention
Temporary Organization
Permanent Organization
Letters to the Convention
Resolutions adopted
General Secretary's Report
Report of the Executive Committee of the National Association
Report of Enrollment Committee
Subscription for the Treasury
Election of Officers of the National Association

ADDRESSES BEFORE THE CONVENTION

By the Rev. D. McAllister
By the Hon. F. R. Brunot, President of the Convention
By Dr. E. R. Craven
By Dr. J. H. McIlvaine
By Dr. Stephen H. Tyng, Sr
By President A. A. Miner
By President G. P. Hays
By the Rev. J. P. Lytle
By the Rev. J. Hogg
By President H. H. George
By the Rev. Dr. H. Edwards
By Prof. J. R. W. Sloane
By Dr. A. M. Milligan

Copyright 1872
Year Printed 1872

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